Jeffery Laudenslager

Brad Howe
A master kinetic illusionist, Jeffery Laudenslager tricks our minds with ever-changing geometries – even his static sculptures appear animated. Relying on astonishing geometric principles, his works in stainless steel and/or titanium maintain an air of contemplation and captivation.

Laudenslager’s elegant kinetic sculptures are often compared to the work of the late George Rickey, who was fascinated with the subliminal tension that mounts as one moving element nearly misses another. He once commented, “These narrow escapes provide a sculptural equivalent to the tension suggested in painting…such as the hands of Adam and God on the Sistine ceiling.”

Jeffery Laudenslager has taken these dramatic moments of perceived danger to an extreme, expressing the predicament of nearly colliding elements with elegance. The movement of his kinetic works often juxtaposes arcs with rectilinear shapes, creating a delightful play among the varied geometric forms.

In 1999, Laudenslager’s 34-foot high kinetic sculpture Archimage, commissioned for the Torrey Reserve complex in Del Mar, CA, received the coveted Orchid Award in the Fine Arts category. This prize has highlighted the best in architecture, design, and fine art in the San Diego area for the last twenty-four years.

Laudenslager’s sculptures can be found in corporate and public collections throughout the country, as well as in private collections in the USA, England, Switzerland, Germany, Taiwan, and South Korea.

 


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